Community Garden

All Nations Kitchen Garden
Township/suburb:
Northcote
Municipality:
Darebin
Notes (in their own words):

This garden is membership-based but membership is free.

What: Darebin Council collaborated with members of the Northcote Library Food Garden and the local communuity to develop this visible and accessible urban food demonstration site. The All Nation Kitchen Garden design incorporates permaculture principles and is based on a multi-layered garden of fruit trees, edible understory and ground cover.

Who: A group of local residents care for and manage the site in partnership with Council. The goal is to sustainably produce local food and to provide opportunities for education and community building.

When: Community gardening days are held on the first Saturday of each month, from 10am.

Balam-Balam Community Garden
Township/suburb:
Carlton North
Municipality:
City of Yarra
Notes (in their own words):

This garden is open to the public.

The Balam-Balam community garden comprises a number of communal plots, a market garden, herbaceous border, hot house and indigenous bushfood garden. The garden supplies produce to the local Community Grocer market held weekly at the Carlton public housing estate and to migrant and refugee students at Carlton Neighbourhood Learning Centre studying English.

The garden includes a community compost hub where you can contribute your food scraps to be recycled into nutrient-rich compost for the garden. Ask them for a food scrap container if needed. During business hours, enter via the back gate and deposit your scraps directly in to the compost hub. Outside business hours, place contents in the green bin (you will need to contact them to get the code to the lock).

Enquire about buying a bag of compost for $5 and seedlings for your garden grown in the Balam-Balam community garden when available.

Bedford Park Community Garden
Township/suburb:
Ringwood
Municipality:
Maroondah
Notes (in their own words):

This garden is open to the public.

Click here to read an interview with Jess Ness.

This project began as a dream of the manager at the Central Ringwood Community Centre when she spied an empty unused sunny patch of grass that begged to be filled with plants and people. This site used to be a skateboarding park that was filled in and left.

In 2022, the garden had to be dismantled to make room for some road making equipment but is now being re-developed.

As well as space for vegetables and fruit trees, there are also community composting facilities and a community worm farm, both built from reclaimed materials.

They sometimes run workshops and classes at the garden. See their Facebook page for details.

Bellfield Community Garden
Township/suburb:
Bellfield
Municipality:
Banyule
Notes (in their own words):

This garden is membership-based.

The garden was incorporated in 2014, and is entirely run by volunteers. It was established at its new location in 2022.

The three main aims are:

1. To develop an open space community fruit and vegetable garden for individual community members and community groups who want to engage in, and learn about, sustainable gardening practices.

2. To provide a meeting place for individual community members and groups to develop a community gardening identity.

3. To promote the Bellfield Community Garden within the Bellfield neighbourhood, and across the Banyule council area and neighbouring council areas, and to form strong community partnerships to enhance and influence the success of the garden.

Box Hill Community Gardens
Township/suburb:
Box Hill
Municipality:
Whitehorse
Notes (in their own words):

This garden is allotment-based.

The gardens were established around 30 years ago on council land. There are 34 plots, 3 of which are standing plots. Most people grow vegetables for their own use. At present, there is a long waiting list about approximately three to four years.

Brunswick Neighbourhood House Community Garden
Township/suburb:
Brunswick
Municipality:
Merri-Bek
Notes (in their own words):

This garden is membership-based but is open to the public whenever the neighbourhood house is open (Mon-Thur 9am-4pm and Fri 9am-midday).

The garden is a communal garden which comprises a mixture of raised and wicking beds. It is a place to meet neighbours and have a chat. Everyone is welcome.

Bulleke-bek Park Community Garden
Township/suburb:
Brunswick
Municipality:
Merri-Bek
Notes (in their own words):

This garden is open to the public and membership is free.

The garden is in the new Bulleke-Bek park near Anstey station. In a small community park in a high-density neighbourhood, the garden is a space for the many local people who live in apartments to cultivate a little bit of green. It comprises around six wicking beds and a food forest, initially established planted in 2020. The harvest is for anyone and everyone in the community. The garden is open and there is substantial foot traffic, with children visiting from the playground close by and Brunswick folk passing through the park on their way to Sydney Road.

They meet once a month to discuss planting and projects, to share a cup of tea or coffee and the results of our home baking projects – see their Facebook page for dates and times.

Folks often garden or harvest between meetings, and their garden aspirations include: enjoying the park; linking up with other community groups; growing their gardening knowledge; engaging with council to understand and provide feedback about food security and community gardening in Brunswick; imagining a composting future for their high-density community; and what their food forest might look like in a few years’ time.

Buna Reserve Community Garden
Township/suburb:
Heidelberg West
Municipality:
Banyule
Notes (in their own words):

This garden is becoming membership based, but membership is free. Any members of the public are welcome to attend working bees and other events and go into the garden whenever volunteers are there.

The garden comprises a number of raised beds. It is a safe and harmonious place for community to come together to learn and share gardening and other skills and develop friendships. Its main aim is to grow more than enough food so that they can share it with our community; for example, they share produce with the Aboriginal Foodshare at Barrbunin Beek Gathering Place.

They follow permaculture principles and crop rotation as much as they can. They are also interested in syntropic-agroforestry principles, mimicking nature and utilising nature’s services as best they can. They seed save and there are 6 compost bays. Often they will share some food and a cuppa together as well. Some local play groups are involved and sometimes they organise events.

The garden is open to everyone on Thursdays, 3.30-5.30pm. Anyone is welcome to visit the garden when it is open and lend a hand or just enjoy the space, and if you are keen to be more involved then please enquire about becoming a volunteer!

Bundoora Park Community Garden
Township/suburb:
Bundoora
Municipality:
Darebin
Notes (in their own words):

This garden is allotment-based.

What: The garden is located within the Bundoora Park Farm. Within the farm, there is a fruit orchard including an urban farm with chooks and bees. The farm also supplies tools, water and manure.

Who: There are garden plots available for rent to the general public. Annual fees are $79 for a raised plot and $105 for a standard plot. There is a waiting list for these plots.

Canterbury Community Garden
Township/suburb:
Canterbury
Municipality:
Boroondara
Notes (in their own words):

This garden is closed for a major re-development until some time in 2024.

This garden is allotment-based.

The Canterbury Community Garden was created in 2006 and provides a focal point for members of the local community who are supportive of the general principles of sustainability in the growing and sharing of food. It is made up of 36 plots, ranging in size, with annual fees of $50 or $60 depending on the size of the plot. All the plots are currently allocated and there is a substantial waiting list. Plot holders generally grow vegetables or small flowers. There are also some communal areas where fruit trees are grown, along with herbs and shared items. Gardeners take full responsibility for the up keep of their plots and are also required to attend at least two working bees each year to address larger maintenance tasks.

The group is run by a committee and the garden is part of the new Canterbury Community Hub.

CERES Community Garden
Township/suburb:
Brunswick East
Municipality:
Merri-Bek
Notes (in their own words):

This garden is allotment-based, mostly individual allotments plus a shared allotment area. There are around 50 garden plots which are rented out yearly to those with limited household space for growing.

There are regular working bees and social BBQs. These provide opportunities for gardeners to mingle, share freshly grown produce, swap seeds and pitch in to help maintain the site.

Coburg Common
Township/suburb:
Coburg
Municipality:
Merri-Bek
Notes (in their own words):

This garden is membership-based, but is also open to the public on Mondays, Wednesdays, Fridays and Saturdays, 10am-1pm, at which times there are also plants for sale.

Membership is open to anyone who has an interest in gardening, for a nominal fee of $20 per annum or $10 for concession card holders. There are no individual plots and the produce is shared amongst the members.

Coburg Common first came into existence in 2020, when 6 garden boxes were rolled onto a barren site and slowly but surely the garden has taken shape since then.

Coburg Common is operated by a volunteer group called The Gardening Mob Inc (GMI). GMI was formed by some of the volunteers who previously ran Peppertree Place in Urquhart Street Coburg before it was taken over by Kevin Heinze GROW. The Uniting Church kindly allows the volunteers to utilise some land beside the church. GMI’s purpose is to enhance the opportunity for gardening for people of all abilities and to increase socialisation in the community through gardening, related activities and skill sharing and knowledge. They use sustainable practices and aim to be socially inclusive in all their endeavours.

Operations are partly funded through plant sales, many of which have been donated by the local community. The eclectic array of garden decor, pots and furniture is recycled or re-used hard rubbish rescues and donations. The artwork displayed in the garden was created by volunteers at various stages.

Coburg Common has formed relationships with the Coburg Community Library and the local University of the Third Age. They have also hosted a mental health day and run various workshops on propagation and tool maintenance and sharpening.

New members are always welcome.

Condell Growers and Sharers Community Garden
Township/suburb:
Fitzroy
Municipality:
City of Yarra
Notes (in their own words):

This garden is open to the public.

The community garden comprises 36 garden boxes. These used to be allocated to individuals but are now mainly communal, with everyone invited to sample the bounty. The garden is maintained by local residents – providing access to fresh food and encouraging sustainability.

There are monthly working bees, usually on the 2nd Saturday of every month, 10.30am-12.30pm.

There is an active composting program which aims to be reduce the food waste that goes into Yarra City’s rubbish bins and to create compost for the garden. If you would like to contribute your food waste, email them to arrange a time to participate in a 15-20 minute composting tutorial which will entitle you to participate in the program.

Creeds Farm Community Garden
Township/suburb:
Epping
Municipality:
Whittlesea
Notes (in their own words):

This garden is open to the public.

The garden is a communal garden where participants share both the gardening and the harvest. There are no fences, nor individual plots. The aims are:

  • To be a shared community garden where participants share the gardening and the harvest.
  • To provide space for the community to share knowledge and enhance social connection.
  • To act as a learning and demonstration centre for communal organic gardening.

There is a get together on the 4th Sunday of each month, 10.30-midday.

Croxton Community Garden / Marra Guwiyap Community Garden
Township/suburb:
Northcote
Municipality:
Darebin
Notes (in their own words):

This garden is membership based but all the beds are communal. Members share produce, seed collecting, propagating, planting and harvesting tasks.

The garden came into existence in 2021 on an abandoned tennis court adjacent to Croxton Railway Station.

Most of the vegetables, herbs and berries are grown in custom-built wicking beds. Tools and equipment are on-site and a composting and worm farm setup provides much of the nutrients required. As at 2023, a small fruit tree orchard is expanding, and an edible indigenous plant garden is being developed. A local kindergarten has a small, child-sized veggie bed just for them.

The garden is a place for growing food, eco-sustainability, sharing activities, fun and learning together. The vision is for a shared, accessible space, creating a safer, healthier and more resilient environment and providing an amenity where the broader neighbourhood can come together in shared social and educational events.

There is a working bee on the 3rd Sunday of each month, 10am-1pm, followed by a shared lunch. Everyone is welcome.

Croydon Community Garden
Township/suburb:
Croydon
Municipality:
Maroondah
Notes (in their own words):

This garden is allotment-based.

There are 76 allotments (with most being 36 square metres), plus 6 raised garden beds, for a total size of 3,000 square metres. Membership is $10-20 pa, which includes an allotment, water and access to equipment (spades, forks, barrows, mowers, etc).

The garden has been in operation since the 1980s. Its purpose is to enable each person to grow things on their own individual allotment, with any excess to be shared with other allotment holders. There is a diversity of cultures/nationalities within the gardens, including heritance of; Anglo Saxons; Italians; Greek; Malaysian; Burmese; Mexican; South America; and Baltics. Members members learn from each other and try different plants, methods of cultivation and how to grow plants.

Diamond Creek, Planter Boxes in Chute Street
Township/suburb:
Diamond Creek
Municipality:
Nillumbik
Notes (in their own words):

The produce from these planter boxes is freely available to any members of public who pass by.

There are 7 planter boxes in Chute Street (5 on the north side of the road and 2 on the south side) plus a further 2 around the corner in Inglis Street. Each of these is a wicking bed. They were established in 2014.

Doncaster Community Gardens
Township/suburb:
Doncaster
Municipality:
Manningham
Notes (in their own words):

This garden is allotment-based. It is currently full and with a waiting list.

Access to the gardens is via a rough private road which runs downwards through the car park between the Kevin Heinze GROW Centre and its commercial nursery.

Doncaster Community Gardens occupies a large tract of Ausnet Services land near power lines at the back of the Kevin Heinze GROW Centre. The land is leased by Manningham Council and it’s huge, comprising 2½ acres of land divided into many rows of connected plots. There are around 140 plots in total, most of which are 10 metres by 4 metres.

Each gardener pays annually per plot, they have access to town water, wheelbarrows, hoses and lawn mowers. It is the plot owner’s responsibility to keep the paths that border their plot maintained and failure to do so can result in the loss of the plot.

In March 2020, Judy Vizzari visited the garden. Read her writeup of the visit.

Doncaster Hill Community Garden
Township/suburb:
Doncaster
Municipality:
Manningham
Notes (in their own words):

This garden is open to the public.

Set amongst the high rise of Doncaster Hill, this garden is an ‘open backyard’ where volunteers learn, play and appreciate growing local food. The emphasis is on collective fun, enjoying the space and coming together as a local community. Participants are rewarded with seed collections, skills workshops and food programs. There are no private plots. Most of the food grown is donated to local food banks and charities.

Regular working bees and skill development programs are run by Felicity Gordon. Join the Facebook group for dates and times.

Eastland Multicultural Community Garden
Township/suburb:
Ringwood
Municipality:
Maroondah
Notes (in their own words):

This garden is membership-based.

The garden provides a safe and welcoming space for people from different cultural backgrounds living or working in Ringwood and surrounds to come together to plant and grow edible crops, participate in other gardening activities, socialise with others and enjoy a communal garden space. There are currently 34 garden plots, some of which are available for rent.

The garden is managed by a management committee comprising office bearers from multicultural backgrounds, as well as representatives from the Migrant Information Centre, Eastern Melbourne.

Membership is $5 for one person, or $10 for a family. Plot fees are currently $25 per plot. Families with over 3 members can apply for two plots, otherwise one plot. Plots eligibility is limited to Health Care Card holders, who are unable to garden at home, and who live within a radius of 5 kilometres of Ringwood.

Edible Hub, Hurstbridge
Township/suburb:
Hurstbridge
Municipality:
Nillumbik
Notes (in their own words):

This initiative is one of a number of related food-related initiatives at the site (others include a food is free table, a twice monthly food swap and a seed library).

This garden is a communal gardening space which is open to the public. It includes numerous wicking beds, a compost station with three large bins, a small perennial food garden, a sensory garden and a picnic/eating area. It is managed according to permaculture principles.

The garden is under the care of group of volunteers whose aim is to provide an inclusive space for locals to connect and learn through topics of food growing, community resilience, and sustainability. The produce from the beds is free for everyone to harvest, promoting the concepts of a sharing economy, and the use of communal land for the production of fresh, local food.

A range of free/low-cost workshops and events are held regularly and advertised through the Edible Hub Facebook page.

Volunteers generally meet on the fourth Thursday of the month at 9.30am to plan or carry out work in the garden. Anyone is welcome to attend and no ongoing commitment to the garden is required. The associated food swaps are held on the 2nd and 4th Saturdays of every month from 10-11am.

Eltham Neighbourhood House Community Veggie Garden
Township/suburb:
Eltham
Municipality:
Nillumbik
Notes (in their own words):

This garden is membership based but membership is free.

The garden comprises several, large, raised beds. It is maintained by a group of volunteers who meet weekly on Thursdays, from 9-11.30am. New members are most welcome, whether you are an experienced gardener or absolute beginner. As well as growing fresh food to share or swap, you can also use the Living & Learning kitchen to make a meal from the harvest. Regular attendance is not required; rather, you can drop in when you like. You can join at any time and they just need you to register once.

Eltham, Planter Boxes outside healthAbility
Township/suburb:
Eltham
Municipality:
Nillumbik
Notes (in their own words):

The produce from this planter box is freely available to any members of public who pass by.

There is a large planter box outside healthAbility at 917 Main Road, Eltham. It is under cover but irrigated. It was established in 2013.

Eucalypt Community Garden
Township/suburb:
Wollert
Municipality:
Whittlesea
Notes (in their own words):

This garden is membership-based ($20 pa for a single and $40 pa for family).

Friends of Eucalypt Estate’s group of volunteers have established a community garden in a public space behind the Bluestone Kitchen Cafe amongst the historic bluestone farmhouse and outbuildings. The garden is a space for the community to participate in growing sustainable organic produce-related activities in a friendly, inter-generational, accessible environment.

The aim of the garden is to provide a multi-functional space which facilitates and promotes community connectedness through the sharing of knowledge, skills and resources, such that people can come together to learn, share, relax and make friends. It is hoped that, over time, it will provide a range of physical, social, economic, cultural and environmental benefits to the diverse community.

They have been able to make progress because of an enormous community effort: they have the use of the land from one of their committee members; donation of a shed from Bunnings; donation of benches; donations of plants and seeds; and, most importantly, donation of time and labour.

There are monthly meetups at the garden, on the 3rd Sunday of every month, starting 10am.

Fairfield Community Garden
Township/suburb:
Alphington
Municipality:
Darebin
Notes (in their own words):

This garden is allotment-based.

The garden has around 20 plots that are rented out annually by individuals or families who reside in the local area, or by community groups engaged in sustainable activities and which are able to contribute consistently to the garden culture.

The garden was established almost 20 years ago and is an initiative of Interact Fairfield Disability Services. It is a dynamic work space, all the time developing according to the energies and interests of participants.

Fawkner Food Bowls
Township/suburb:
Fawkner
Municipality:
Merri-Bek
Notes (in their own words):

This garden is membership-based.

Fawkner Food Bowls is a resident-led group growing food, sharing skills, and socialising in a family-friendly space. It is based on a communal market garden model where members can learn about, and contribute to, growing crops that are then sold to support the running of the garden. They have a range of memberships, with general membership being $25 pa; this entitles people to discounts on produce, events and seedlings. Membership is open to anyone.

Work on the garden began in 2017 with the help of Moreland City Council, Fawkner Bowling Club, and the Neighbourhood Project. They have since received grants from Moreland City Council, CoDesign Studio, Moreland Energy Foundation Inc. and the State Government. The starting point was a disused lawn bowls green. Since that time, they have created social garden spaces, a children’s play area and vegetable growing rows. They are now developing more space for people to bring and share seeds, seedlings, plants, food, and ideas plus they have plans to construct a shelter. Fawkner Food Bowls is an incorporated group.

A number of events, workshops and celebrations are organised at the garden including: soil, composting and companion planting workshops; the Fawkner Lane-way Festival and Fawkner Festas (where tomato seedlings are given away); passata making; and winter solstice celebrations.

The garden is open on Sundays for working bees, market stall, and socialising.

Finbar Neighbourhood Garden
Township/suburb:
Richmond
Municipality:
City of Yarra
Notes (in their own words):

This garden is open to the public.

The garden comprises 10 large garden beds, a compost exchange scheme, and a seed library.

The main purpose of the garden beds is to grow food to give away. Once harvested, the vegetables are put onto ‘food is free’ shelves which the public can access. People can also donate vegetables for these shelves.

The purpose of the compost exchange scheme is to turn kitchen scraps into usable compost. People drop off a bucket of kitchen scraps and take away an empty bucket to fill again. They can also take away compost – anyone can order up to three buckets of compost at a time by phone (9428 7668) or email.

The aim of the seed library is to encourage people to grow food at home. People are welcome to take, share or donate seeds.

Someone is in the garden every Monday from midday to 1.30pm – feel free to drop in for a chat, seek gardening advice, pick up some compost juice, or pick up some worms. There are also regular workshops.

Garden of Plenty, Diamond Valley Library, Greensborough
Township/suburb:
Greensborough
Municipality:
Nillumbik
Notes (in their own words):

The produce from this garden is freely available to any members of public who pass by.

The garden is open to the public 6 days per week and provides a valuable place of engagement, education and participation in sustainable living practices. The produce is available to be shared by the community and also to engage the concept of food sharing. It is a place which is open to all to enjoy either planting, harvesting or tending the garden. The installation of four wicking beds, with the help of Diamond Creek Men’s Shed, has meant the produce is thriving in all conditions and the boxes are at a great height for all to enjoy.

The garden has inter-generational appeal with programs including: storytimes to kindergartens and schools; workshops with schools with an environmental focus; monthly workshops to the general community; and a monthly food swap. The production of a number of food sources are also shared with the community, not only in the garden, but at events such as the Home Harvest Festival.

Associated regular events:
1. Working bee – every Thursday, 10-11am.
2. Food Swap – 2nd Saturday of the month, 10-11am.

An alternative contact is Jackie Moroney (jmoroney@yprl.vic.gov.au).

Glen Park Oaks Community Garden
Township/suburb:
Bayswater North
Municipality:
Maroondah
Notes (in their own words):

This garden is open to the public.

The community garden is a shared communal space for gardening, interacting and learning whereby members of the community can harvest vegetables as well as the group of volunteers who manage the garden. Owned and managed by Maroondah City Council, with the assistance of volunteers, its aim is to focus on, and share, the benefits provided by gardening – where the harvest is just an added bonus.

Hawthorn Community Gardens
Township/suburb:
Hawthorn East
Municipality:
Boroondara
Notes (in their own words):

These gardens are allotment-based.

There are two gardens, one at 381 Riversdale Road, Hawthorn East and the other in Linda Crescent, Hawthorn.

Hawthorn Community Gardens was established in 1980. Across its two locations, it has a total of 86 garden plots. Membership fees range from $80-100 per annum, depending on the size of the plot, and this includes access to gardening tools, water and social gatherings. There is currently a substantial waiting list for both gardens.

Jolimont Community Garden
Township/suburb:
Forest Hill
Municipality:
Whitehorse
Notes (in their own words):

This garden is allotment-based, for people who reside in, or pay rates to, the City of Whitehorse.

The garden was first established in 1977 and was the first community garden in Australia.

It comprises around 120 individual plots plus a few communal areas for herbs and perennials. Each plot is around 35 square metres (e.g. 9 metres by 4 metres) and the total size of the garden is almost 2 acres. Most of the plots are in-ground, with a few raised beds.

Collectively, the plot holders are culturally diverse, with the vegetables being grown therefore also being diverse.

There is some communal equipment, such as a lawn mower, wheelbarrows, spades tools and a trailer.

Watch this video.

The garden is one of two overseen by Nunawading Community Gardens, the other being Slater Community Garden in Blackburn North. The Nunawading Community Gardens committee is responsible for both setting overall policies (e.g. no pesticides or herbicides) and for maintenance of the communal areas (e.g. some of the pathways).

They have a number of get togethers each year, to which plot holders from both of the gardens are invited. They order various products in bulk for members to buy, including seed potatoes. They also hold regular working bees to maintain the communal areas.

All plots are currently allocated and there is a waiting list. Read more about joining the waiting list and potentially apply. As of 2024, the cost of a plot is $30 pa and the cost of being on the waiting list is $5 pa.

Kevin Heinze GROW
Township/suburb:
Doncaster
Municipality:
Manningham
Notes (in their own words):

This garden provides therapeutic programs for people with disabilities and is also open to the public whenever the nursery is open (Monday-Friday 9am–3pm and Saturday 8.30am-12.30pm). Visitors are welcome but are asked to report to the Main Office upon arrival.

Inspired by a visit to a garden for children with disabilities in the UK, the late Kevin Heinze believed that all people should be given the opportunity to take part in gardening activities. He saw the benefits that horticulture-based therapy and recreation programs brought to people with disabilities and wanted to introduce the concept into Australia. Working with the Kiwanis Club of Doncaster and Templestowe volunteers, he raised the seed funds required and, with the help of Manningham Council, secured a lease on some land, where the Centre opened in 1979 and continues to be located today.

Kevin Heinze GROW operates a number of initiatives including: NDIS GROW On (its ‘core program’), GROW ON Transition (for secondary school students); Grow Well (for children who have experienced trauma); CHSP (a Commonwealth Home Support Program for older people with an interest in social and recreational gardening); Grow on the Go Gardening Services (services to the local community for garden maintenance).

The garden hosts two major plant sales each year, in April and October.

In February 2020, Judy Vizzari visited Kevin Heinze GROW. Read her writeup of the visit.

Lilydale Community Gardens
Township/suburb:
Lilydale
Municipality:
Yarra Ranges
Notes (in their own words):

Lilydale Community Gardens is open to the public 24/7.

It comprises a series of planter boxes on the footpath along the main road. Each of these boxes is a wicking bed.

Herbs such as rosemary, mint, oregano and sage are grown, along with some small vegetables and some bee-attracting plants with flowers.

There are also two olive trees growing in tubs.

Seating is provided, including some with chessboard tables.

Some of the gardeners get together on the 2nd Saturday of each month at 11am for coffee and chat.

Links Community Garden Lalor
Township/suburb:
Lalor
Municipality:
Whittlesea
Notes (in their own words):

This garden is open to the public, with free membership (gold coin donation) and communal garden beds.

This is a new and developing community garden. The purpose of Links Community Garden Lalor is to foster community connections though the use of this space. It will include activities such as gardening, cooking, preserving, sustainability, sensory gardens, providing meals for those in need, upcycling, outdoor mothers or other social groups, eating or simply enjoying being in nature.

There are regular meetups at the garden, every Saturday, 10am-midday. All people of all ages are welcome, whether you’re a gardening wizard or don’t know a root from a branch.

Luscombe Street Community Garden
Township/suburb:
Brunswick
Municipality:
Merri-Bek
Notes (in their own words):

This garden is membership-based.

The garden caters for a wide range of abilities and has a number of membership-options. The idea behind the garden is to share knowledge and to learn from each other. There is a mixture of individual and communal plots that are maintained through monthly working bees. The people come together through their mutual love of growing and, if you become a member, you will have the opportunity to meet and share with like-minded individuals, it will save you money over the long term and you will have a positive environmental impact by turning waste into a resource. A committee, who are dedicated to maintaining its future, runs the garden.

Mernda Community Garden
Township/suburb:
Mernda
Municipality:
Whittlesea
Notes (in their own words):

This garden is allotment-based, with some communal beds for members. Membership is around 30 adults plus children.

It is an established community garden on the historical Carome Homestead site, owned by Working Heritage. It is a relaxed space where members share, learn, grow veggies and get dirty! Garden members receive a monthly newsletter. The group tends to a small orchard, compost bays, several worm farms and their communal and private plots.

Mernda Seed, Sow & Grow Community Garden Group
Township/suburb:
Mernda
Municipality:
Whittlesea
Notes (in their own words):

This garden is membership-based but membership is free. It is open to the public every Wednesday, 9am-midday, and the 2nd Saturday of each month, 10.30am-midday.

The garden is an accessible learning space for community members and families interested in being actively engaged, sharing tips and knowledge about gardening, growing food from seed to harvest and sustainable living, re-using, re-purposing and recycling what they can.

Merri Corner Community Garden
Township/suburb:
Brunswick East
Municipality:
Merri-Bek
Notes (in their own words):

This garden is allotment based.

The Merri Corner Community Garden was conceived in 2006 by a group of passionate Brunswick East locals and opened in 2010. It has around 40 plots where plotholders grow a variety of herbs and veggies. Members are from the local area and often don’t have access to much garden space at home.

All are welcome to visit. There is an open garden / working bee on the second Sunday of each month, 10am-midday.

Mooroolbark Community Garden
Township/suburb:
Mooroolbark
Municipality:
Yarra Ranges
Notes (in their own words):

This garden is open to the public 24/7.

The garden is almost an acre in size and includes 12 large raised beds, all of which are communal. The aim is to provide a locally grown, organic, ethical, environmentally friendly, healthy, sustainable and self-funded community food source. Plus it is a place of being and sharing skills, knowledge and ideas for local community members of all ages, genders, ethnicity and abilities.

They have a polytunnel where they grow veggie seedlings for sale and any excess produce is also available for sale

The garden was opened in 2023 and is on a temporary site pending the Council deciding what to do with the site longer term.

There is a gardening club that meets every Wednesday morning 10am-midday. There is usually also someone there on Thursday mornings, 10am-midday, who you can chat with. For anyone that wants to be involved in the garden, they ask that you become a member in order to facilitate communications. As at 2023, annual membership was $15 ($30 for families and free for concession card holders).

Newton Street Community Garden
Township/suburb:
Reservoir
Municipality:
Darebin
Notes (in their own words):

This garden is open to the public.

This is a communal garden on public housing land associated with the East Preston Community Centre. The garden was established in late 2018 and The East Preston Community Centre, in partnership with DIVRS Urban Food Program, are continuing to develop it. Once fully developed, it will include shared vegetable growing areas, fruit trees, berries, food forest gardens and composting/worm farming facilities.

Local community members are invited to get involved in shaping the garden’s look and feel. This is a space where local residents can connect, share, learn and grow food locally. From planting, weeding and harvesting crops to designing what will be planted in the vacant beds – there’s plenty to do.

A gardening group, facilitated by the DIVRS Urban Food Program, work in the garden on Wednesday mornings, 9.30am-midday, and it is open to the general public throughout the week. Everyone is welcome to attend the Wednesday morning sessions. Occasionally, there are bigger working bees.